Archive for January 14th, 2014

By January 14, 2014 Read More →

No KitKat for HTC One X and One X+

No KitKat for HTC One X and One X+Just a few weeks ago we brought you news of HTC’s new pages that allowed us to track the progress of OS updates for the HTC One and several other HTC phones.

On that list you’l find the HTC One Mini and One Max and Desire 601. However, there are a couple of devices that HTC have apparently confirmed that will not see Android 4.4 KitKat and these, most significantly perhaps, include phones like the One X and One X+.

Both the HTC One X and One X+ were hugely popular and can still be found on sale in many locations. Whilst it could perhaps be argued that the One X is getting towards end of life, being two years old on February, but the One X+ is far newer, at October 2012 so its a little worrying that HTC will not be continuing to update these ‘older’ devices and we certainly hops this isn’t a taste of things to come in terms of cutbacks.

Posted in: News, Phones
Tags: ,
By January 14, 2014 Read More →

Sony announces Xperia E1, claims it best in class

1_Xperia_E1_White_FrontToday Sony have announced its latest Android smartphone, the Xperia E1, and claim, based upon its specification, that the E1 is the best device in its class.

The Xperia E1 is powered by Qualcomm’s MSM8210 1.2 GHz Dual Core processor, 512 MB RAM and features a 4 inch (233 ppi) display combined with a large 1700 mAh battery, which is the basis for the ‘best in class’ claim.

Full press release and further details follow:

Posted in: News, Phones
Tags: ,
By January 14, 2014 Read More →

Would you like your Samsung Galaxy S5 in Metal or Plastic?

Samsung-Galaxy-S5Rumour has it the Galaxy S5 will be available in two versions later this year. According to SamMobile an inside source has “confirmed” some of the specs of the company’s next-generation flagship Android handset. Apparently Samsung the next incarnation of the Galaxy S will have a “metallic back plate while being constructed of metal on the sides and front.” There will be a cheaper model made from plastic, just like previous Galaxy S versions, and cost €650 ($888). It will be interesting to see if there is much difference with the rumoured Galaxy F.

Inside the Galaxy S5 is said to be two processors, an Exynos 6 model and a Qualcomm Snapdragon 805 CPU. The Exynos model featuring 64-bit support and built-in LTE, and will likely equip the metal Galaxy S5 model, while the Snapdragon would be found inside the plastic version. Both versions would feature a 5.25-inch Super AMOLED display with Quad HD (2560 x 1440) resolution, a 16-megapixel camera and Android 4.4 KitKat out of the box. Details about RAM, battery capacity and optical image stabilization support for the main camera are not available at this time.

Why stop there, when speculation should quickly lead to a Galaxy S5 Mini and the Galaxy S5 Zoom? With the Galaxy S5 possibly being unveiled in mid-March during an event in London, we should see the device roll out to market early April. A Galaxy S5 Mini is expected to be unveiled in June, and feature a Super AMOLED display and run KitKat, while the Galaxy S5 Zoom would be announced in May, sport a 4.8-inch qHD (960 x 540) display and run KitKat as well. 

Posted in: News, Phones, Rumours
Tags: ,
By January 14, 2014 Read More →

The future of Tachograph technology

TachographDigital tachographs are well established in Europe. The technology first took centre stage in 2004 and was made compulsory by the EU in 2006 for vehicles over three and half tonnes. The technology is used to track and record the time a driver spends behind the wheel and how fast they are going. They are commonplace in the transport industry where employers have to manage and stay within EU drivers’ laws.

However, recent developments in India have lead the country to start considering the adoption of the technology.  In an article published by Dipak Kumar and Pankaj Doval for The Times of India, the Road Transport Ministry in Karnataka are seeking an explanation for a series of recent bus fires. The ministry sought an explanation from manufacturer Volvo and are also looking into the possibility that overworked drivers could be behind the incidents. A spokesperson from Volvo said that a finalised report is coming soon, as they are still conducting an inquiry into the case.  

Tachograph technology could greatly benefit India when investigating traffic accidents like this in the future. Automobiles can be fitted with a digital tachograph and the data from a driver’s journey can be recorded onto a ‘driver card’. The information stored on this card can be periodically downloaded by transport authorities or employers to track the driver’s speed, distance travelled and rest times.

While this may sound good in theory, questions are raised as to which governing bodies would check and enforce this technology. In the EU, it is an employer’s responsibility to keep track of these driving records and be ready to present them when transport authorities require them. Failure to make or keep records under GB domestic rules can lead to fines up to £2,500.

Aside from it being a legal requirement, there are a number advantages to digital tachograph equipment. It helps reduce the likelihood of unfair competition when a business forces its drivers to work over their legal driving hours. As such, it creates a fairer market where smaller companies that abide by the rules aren’t being muscled out by exploitative competitors.

The technology also allows employers to identify problem areas and improve their efficiency. Stoneridge Electronics are a company which provide tachograph analysis packages that can be very beneficial to employers. They can use the analysis software to create business reports and track trends. If drivers aren’t taking the most efficient routes for example, employers can work with them and improve efficiency. It is also a good deterrent against bad driving habits like speeding.

But perhaps the biggest advantage to tachograph devices are their usefulness in the event of a road accident. If a driver is ever involved in a crash, the tachograph will give a detailed report of how fast they were going and how long they had been driving. When this data is stood up against eye-witness accounts and other testimony, it can be invaluable for shedding light on the events.

While the implementation of tachographs in India may only be a pipe-dream, it’s clear the country could make excellent use of this technology and the advantages it provides.

Posted in: Editorial