Archive for November 16th, 2016

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Tech Addicts UK Podcast – 16th November 2016 – A Return to Form

grid-bubsGareth Myles, Jay Garrett, Gavin Fabiani-Laymond and Leila Gregory

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Show Notes

Listener feedback:

1) Any idea on the UK release date of the new Mi Box?

Andrew Rodgers

Import works only in mainland China, nothing is working: PPTV is blocked, LETV is blocked as well, so you can not see any programs or series, even those, which you are allowed to watch abroad.

2)  what is Thunderbolt 3? Is that a Mac connection and will it be compatible with USB-C?

Raj

http://www.laptopmag.com/articles/thunderbolt-3-guide

What have you been playing with?

Gareth

Gavin

Jay

Discussion: Star Wars Battle Droids

Discussion: HUAWEI MATE 9 IN A NUTSHELL

Discussion: Designed by Apple in California – Apple’s £249 Book

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Email: [email protected]

Twitter: @garethmyles ; @gavinfabiani  ; @GadgetyNewsCom ; @JayGarrett ; @swanny

Web: http://gavinsgadgets.com ; http://GadgetyNews.com ; http://swanny.me/

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By November 16, 2016 Read More →

7 Essential Tips for First-Time PC Builders

asusmb_90mb0md0_01Building your own PC means creating a device tailored to your very own needs. It’s easy to upgrade, often cheaper and can perform much faster than traditional models. So, if you’re going down the DIY route and it’s your first time custom-building your own machine, here are 7 essential tips to consider, provided by German online electronics retailer, reichelt.

  1. Get clear on what you want from your PC. Make a list of all the programs, videos and applications you want to run on your PC. This will help you map out the components you’ll need – for example, if you’re a gamer, overclocking your Central Processing Unit (running it at a higher speed) may be important and requires a more effective cooling system.
  1. Plan before you build. Every build is unique, so take the time to visualize how each part will fit together, before buying and realising components aren’t compatible. Does your power supply prevent access to the motherboard? Is there enough space for your cabinet? Asking questions such as these will save you time in the long run!
  1. Test the connection. Always do a simple test-run before installing the components in your cabinet. This will save you the hassle of dismantling everything in case a component doesn’t work. Simply use your motherboard box as a framework and if all functions properly, you’re ready to build in.
  1. Keep thermal paste to a minimum. A small, pea-sized amount in the centre of your CPU (Central Processing Unit) is perfect. Too much and the thermal compound could behave as a conductor and stop your system from functioning properly.
  1. Don’t force anything. If it doesn’t fit, don’t force it. Most components attach together only one way, so simply try another method if it doesn’t work. Computer parts tend to be very fragile, so be careful not to damage your components in the process.
  1. Ensure good airflow.  Cooling your PC properly contributes to the overall performance and lifespan of your device. You can choose to cool your system with air or water. The air cooler is cheap and performs well, however, if you are planning to overclock (run your processor at a higher speed), a water cooler allows fans to run slower and quieter.
  1. A little maintenance goes a long way! Once you’ve built your computer, ensure that you open up the device and clean it regularly. Keep dust levels to a minimum and your machine will continue to operate at an optimum level.

For high-quality components to build your PC, reichelt can provide you with everything you need, with many products up to 20% cheaper than elsewhere in the UK.

For gamers, we recommend the ASUS Z170 Pro Gaming 6 Motherboard, a high-value, feature-packed board which delivers outstanding performance. Processors, RAM and storage functions are also available; as is a great range of external hardware, such as the Denon HEOS 1 WS 2 Wireless Speakers with WiFi and optimised sound quality.

By November 16, 2016 Read More →

Griffin iTrip Clip Bluetooth Adaptor Review

2016-11-16Not long ago, those evil people at Apple stole our headphone sockets and forced us to use their proprietary headphones or one of their adaptors. There was fighting in the streets, human sacrifice, dogs and cats living together… mass hysteria!

Or at least so the media would have you believe. As it turned out, most people just got on with it and the fact that Apple provided both a set of headphones and an adaptor in the box meant it really wasn’t much of an issue after all. Now, to say that it didn’t present a few little logistical grumbles would be fair. For instance, you cannot charge your device whilst listening to music unless you have a different adaptor or Bluetooth headphones. Then there is the fact that you have to always have the adaptor with you if, like most people, you have multiple sets of headphones – one in your bag, maybe one in the office and one at home. Apple would tell you that the adaptors are only £9 each, so you can buy more. Of course, they would.

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Then comes along the Griffin iTrip Clip (no apple accessory can start with anything other than an “i”), an absolutely genius diminutive device that solves a problem simply and tidily. The iTrip allows the user to plug in any regular old headset and instantly convert it into a Bluetooth set, complete with handy-dandy controls for media playback and volume up to a range of 15m. It also has a built-in microphone to allow you to make your headphones into a Siri-compatible hands-free kit. Want to plug it into your car’s aux socket and stream music and calls from your phone? It’ll do that too! And the joy of it is that the device itself is very small and neat, it weighs almost nothing and has a clip for attaching to your clothing. There is no display on the device, but red and blue LEDs indicate its status and helpfully lets you know when the 4-6 hour active battery life is coming to an end. So how much is this do-it-all-dolly? You’ll find it for under £20! Bargaintastic!

Now the device is by no means perfect, I noticed immediately that the volume was much louder than when the headphones were plugged directly in. Normally I’d have the headphones volume sitting around half way, but through the iTrip, I get the same volume at about a quarter of the way up the scale. Not a huge deal, but if like me, you like to listen to music at night just before you drift off, the very first volume point is about the right volume for me, but if you wanted it any softer…..unlucky. When turning on, off or connecting to a device there is an electronic voice that confirms the action. Handy, but watch out, this is loud too! In saying that, I’d rather have to turn the volume down than have to max it out just get any sound out.

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Music streams perfectly clearly through the little Griffin, the responsiveness is spot on and there is very little lag time between pressing the button and the reaction on the device, but I did notice that when I was watching videos, there is an ever so slight delay between the video and the sound. This delay isn’t present when the headphones are plugged directly in, but it is consistently present when using the iTrip. It’s only slight, but it’s enough to throw the lip synch off just enough to make everything looked like it’s been dubbed into English.

The clip used to attach the device to your clothing is somewhat stiff and is moulded into the unit. Personally, I would prefer something a bit less snappable if you are trying to push it onto a heavy coat etc, maybe a spring clip or similar. This is a very minor issue though and for £20, if it snaps, you aren’t going to be in floods of tears, mourning its loss.

I’m amazed that Griffin can produce this device in the £15-20 range and at this price point the functionality it delivers dwarfs its few little niggles. Sure, I’d like a longer battery life, but then the device would probably have to be bigger and the price would definitely go up so it’s a good balance. This is an easy recommendation for anyone with an iPhone 7, but beyond that, it will also work with any phone or tablet, making it a versatile little gizmo that anyone could use. Thumbs up from me.