gaming

By May 7, 2017 Read More →

SpeedLink DECUS RESPEC Gaming Mouse Review

P1030695There is no shortage of gaming mice out there, however, the is no one mouse that would suit all hands. Some like smaller mice, lighter, to the point, configurable. Putting a list together of all the things you want from a mouse is actually quite difficult, and you might find the almost perfect combination however it lacks that one little feature that is could well be a deal breaker. The Speedlink Decus Respec has a number of possibilities you might want to consider when on the hunt.

Over the last couple of weeks, I have been looking at a number of Speedlink products, primarily a keyboard and a gamepad. These combined features and a low price particularly well I found it quite difficult to find fault. Aside from some disappointing software Speedlink seemed to be on the money.

Working around the mouse, we can see the Decus Respec is designed with the right-handed gamer in mind there does not appear to be a left handed variant available in this particular model. The whole device has been moulded to the contours of the hand and the body fits easily under the hand, including the pinky and ring finger, more on this later.

The thumb has access to a forward and back button, now a staple in mouse standards, from a resting position. The back button takes no effort to press, however, the forward does require a little stretch from the thumb to tap, useful to ensure you do not hit the wrong button and the forward never gets as much action as the back in daily usage.

The index finger sits on the Left Mouse Button (LMB) however it is surrounded by controls. First of all is the larger button next to the LMB, the Double Tap button. This button has a configurable double click for the left button, to save you the effort of double clicking yourself. The instance between the clicks can be set using the software provided.

Behind the scroll wheel is a DPI button, enables the user to adjust the mouse’s sensitivity to a faster or slower pointer speed. The Scroll wheel has a rubber tire style tread around it allowing for extreme grip, the wheel is clickable also.

On the right of the mouse as two extra grooves for the ring and pinky fingers. These are exceptionally comfortable, even to those who wield larger hands, like me. Whilst they are an interesting addition, they increase the size of the mouse considerably to a little over 90mm. Some might be happier to forgo this addition for a smaller mouse, however once used for an extended gaming session, the benefits are obvious.

The underside of the mouse has four smooth plastic plates around the edge to maximise smoothness, especially when under on a gaming surface. The optics are in the centre.

Large size does not always make something heavier. The Decus Respec is a heavy mouse out of the box, however, it is a weighted mouse. Underneath the house is a cavity holding four 4.5g weights. For those who find the mouse heavy, this can be adjusted or perhaps a lighter mouse may suit a particular game, the user can adjust on the fly.

A lengthy, hardwearing, braided cord connects the mouse to the computer. At the end of this is a custom designed USB connection that stands out from the rest. You will not make any mistakes pulling this out instead of another peripheral.

LEDs seem to be all the rage and Speedlink seem to love them. The Decus Respec is a slave to the popular culture here. The mouse emits a breathing glow of colour cycling through the spectrum when the computer is on. The slits look somewhat like shark gills on the sides. Only the Decus glows on the top with the Respec sitting in black ink.

Overall, the makings of this gaming mouse are superb. Whilst they are not for everyone, it’s getting close.

The speedlink software is in keeping with their other software, unfortunately, this means the task bar icon is identical to the Gaming software.

The software is easy to use and has some fairly useful features. To the top is the main profile editor allowing for 5 profiles and button configuration. To the right of this allows the use to play around with the lighting effects, there isn’t an extensive range of customisation, however, some is better that none.

Below this is a selection of menus for Performance, speed, system and buttons, alongside settings.

Under Speed, you can adjust the mouse DPI, alongside the X/Y, USB polling rate or rapid fire.

Under System Windows mouse settings like pointer speed and scrolling speed can be adjusted.

Finally under Settings are … no settings. Driver updates and reset defaults is all you find here.

To play a game makes for a top notch experience. I primarily game on a Logitech MX Master, a non-gaming mouse,  and find it to be almost perfect for everything I need. The Speedlink Decus Repec keeps up with the Logitech’s precision and performance and adds a few extra buttons that I now look for and perhaps even rely on in certain games.

The Decus Respec sits around £50 on Amazon right now and it’s bargain at that price. The build quality is that of a higher price mouse and the comfort is unparalleled. Combined with the fact that it does exactly what you want it to do in the games you are using it with means this is a brilliant buy for the casual and hardcore gamer. Certainly, a few more settings in the software might push the boat out here, but for now, the Decus Respec is staying hooked up to my computer for now and it will take something incredible to make me want to swap it out. Top marks to Speedlink!

The Speedlink Decus Pespec is available from Amazon here.

By April 25, 2017 Read More →

Speedlink QUINOX Pro USB Gamepad Review

P1030630For years gamepads for PCs were not a thing, now it seems, they have caught up with and even overtake the complex stylings of the console competition. Some prefer them, so, therefore, there is a market. Microsoft and Playstation are forever bettering their input methods from generation to generation and sometimes in between, however with the PC gamers can open a whole next level of customisation and Speedlink knew this, delivering the Quinox Pro. This is a comfortable gamepad, with reconfiguration to the hilt and a price that doesn’t upset.

Looking around the device the front sees most of the action. A D-pad with independent buttons might be one of the more controversial design elements. The non-replaceable thumb sticks are identical and possess a decent amount of travel. Four large action buttons sit to the right with illumination. A Back and Start button sit in the centre with a large Xbox style guide button. A small OLED screen is positioned in the centre bottom region.

On the back, there are 4 accessible paddles and two slider switches, one for switching vibration on and off, the other switches from Xinput to Directinput, cunningly titled X and D. Crucially, the Quinox supports both Directinput, for mouse input signals and Xinput, mimicking the Xbox configuration.

On the bottom are two controller dials which, when pressed or flicked left and right, navigate a menu on the OLED screen.

These dials are separated into left and right and adhere to the left of right thumbstick for the most part. flicking dial brings up the. The left dial configures and selects the Marco modes, remapping buttons to the bumper buttons and paddles on the top and back. Flicking the right dial and using the D-pad turn the LEDs on and off. Time is required to get the most out of these buttons. Initially, they are quite confusing however, the benefits are obvious once you successfully bind a button to a complicated button combination.

The top sees two analogue triggers and two bumper buttons. In addition, there are two programmable buttons. These require quite a bit of extra travel and should not be relied on for frequent usage.

The Quinox connects by a 2.4m braided microUSB to USB cable that is detachable from the controller. This is a good length to please most folks, of course from some I won’t be long enough however it is replaceable with a longer MicroUSB cable. One warning is, do not pull this out unless you have to, plugging the cable back into the controller is not easy and quite frustrating. The braided cable is good quality, tough yet soft to the touch.

In the hand, the Quinox Pro is a comfortable gamepad. Very similar in feel to the Xbox One controller if a little thinner. The rear paddles might be a little uncomfortable for the larger hands however they might just take some getting used to. Gaming feels quite natural however as an old school gamer I found it a little daunting to have so many buttons, something the youth or seasoned gamer might not experience.

The build quality is perfectly acceptable with strong plastic and durable buttons that feel they last a long time and take quite a pounding.There are no details or design flourishes to speak of and this is quite refreshing where an over saturated market has some great controllers with nonsense etched into the body. Speedlink have things, simple and black but not without and an eye-catching dash of red.

Some folks will use a Gamepad for every game, personally I am not a fan of gamepads in general, however, I do concede they have their merit when pairing with the right game. Project Car has some easy benefit from the analogue sticks, platforming games perform well and the controller wipes the floor with any keyboard and mouse combo. However, it cannot measure up to a first person shoot or strategy game that demand keyboard and mouse.

The Speedlink Quinox Pro USB has everything you would want from a gamepad. There is little to fault and a price tag that makes it worth considering.

For more information, check out the Speedlink site here.

Posted in: Accessories, gaming, Reviews
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By April 16, 2017 Read More →

Speedlink Ultor Review

P1030602Speedlink have sent over their latest Ultor Mechanical Gaming Keyboard and a keyboard that can be considered as a portable offering. Featuring Red switches the Ultro loses the numerical pad leaving the keyboard much shorter than other on the market and a lower price tag than some of the competitors.

This mechanical keyboard has an impressive metallic red chassis buried under its keys. There are only small portions of the chassis peeking out in various places as Speedlink have cut down on any excess to make a keyboard truly too the point. The Chassis might have a plastic underside however that makes sense as it is rarely visible.

The keys on the Ultor feature Red switches, also known as Kailh switches. Kailh switches may be a copy of Cherry MX (Red) however they have a good reputation in the gaming community and are not a cheap alternative or second best. that are almost indistinguishable from their Cherry MX (Red) counterparts.

Some may take issue with the lack of additional keys, volume control and no USB or audio ports. There is a multitude of gaming keyboards on the market and it’s refreshing to have a mechanical keyboard in its purest form. There will be a market out there.

Underneath, the keyboard features three rubber feet that keep the keyboard in one place when in use and two rear legs can be raised or lower depending on the angle required. These 10mm legs can be locked into position and only feature one locking position. The are not adjustable.

Connecting the keyboard to the computer is a hard wearing braided cable. Oddly this connects off centre on the keyboard, however, I can’t imagine too many people finding fault with this, perhaps it was in the centre before a D’Pad was chopped off. The cable is 1.7m long and that feels generous.

When activated the keys glow blue and leak light stylishly onto the red chassis and things look pretty good. Some might scoff that the keys should glow red to match the keyboard, however, the blue allows for a much clear visual especially when tapping away, late at night, much like I am doing now. The buttons are bright and eye catching and I am personally a fan of the blue on red. A nice mix from Speedlink. The WASD and cursor buttons glow white to differentiate themselves and it’s a nice touch. However, there is no option for the user to colour coordinate and this might both some. The default is good, but customisation is always better.

 

Losing keys does not mean losing functions, additional functionality comes from the Fn button found to the right of the Space Bar. This alters the functionality of all of the F keys along the top of the keyboard alongside the Print Screen and Scrl Lock keys.

F1 through to F4 adjusts the USB polling Rate.

F5 through to F8 are media controls

F9 pulls up your media player and F10 through to F12 are volume controls

The Print Screen key turns the Ultor into Gaming mode, activating the Macro keys. Scrl Lock key adjusts of Brightness in a cycling mode and a Breathing Effect thrown in for fun. There are 11 different brightness levels (10% increments including off.) Under these buttons is a total of Six Macros keys described as M1 to M6 are configurable through the Speedlink software.

In use I found the keys to be responsive and comfortable. The odd time I had to remind myself that this is a mechanical keyboard and it responds to the tiniest pressure and resting a finger on the button can accidentally register a hit.

For typing, the keys don’t feel too crammed together, however, there isn’t much space between each for someone with large fingers like myself. If you think you might have encroached on a neighbouring key then you likely have as the keys are that sensitive. The Return button does have an odd quirk. Tapping the bottom right corner can cause a crunch, it will still register the stroke however it just feels a little unnatural.

The Speedlink software is not lacking in any features however it doesn’t really go above and beyond either. We have three tabs, Main keys, Macros and Advanced. Along the bottom are five profile tabs, when selected each of these profiles will be configurable by the three tabs above.

Under the Main Keys tab, you can remap keys for each profile and remapping is as simple as clicking on the key and reassigning the function in a pop-up menu. This is for key remapping only, not button combinations.

The Macro tab is where you can reassign any of the six Macro keys. The Macro keys allow for simple keyboard commands or more complex commands such as Windows functions and key combination.

The Advanced tab allows you to adjust various other settings on the keyboard such as USB Polling Rate, Windows Key Setting Key, Response Time and Light Intensity. Not entirely sure why these are summarised as Advanced and adjusting something like the brightness here adds an awkward delay in the outcome on the keyboard. You are better off using the Fn key.

If I was to gripe about one thing, it would be the tray icon, it’s the same as other peripherals from Speedlink, if you own a Speedlink mouse you will have to guess or hover over to assess which tray icon you need to open to adjust any settings.

Overall, I like the Speedlink Ultro very much and it has become my main keyboard, at least for the time being. The compact design saves space and the red, metal chassis is a subtle eye-catcher. With the price tag of around £80, the Ultro is great value and a superb example of a gaming keyboard on a budget. This much quality at such a low price is hard to find.

You can pick one up from Amazon here.

Posted in: Accessories, gaming, Reviews
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By March 28, 2017 Read More →

A Look At The Speedlink Ultor Keyboard

vlcsnap-00015What can £75 get you in the way of compact mechanical gaming keyboards? Quite a handsome keyboard it would appear. Here we take a look at the Speedlink ULTOR Illuminated Mechanical Gaming Keyboard with LED Illumination, Anti-ghosting, macro editor, freely configurable, internal memory.

  • Professional gaming keyboard with mechanical keys
  • Progressive Gaming Mode with 5 profiles, 6 macro keys, swappable WASD and arrow keys, remappable keys plus Windows key deactivation
  • Simple layout with compact, frameless design and aluminium body
  • N-key rollover for extreme anti-ghosting
  • Flexible USB cable with hard-wearing sheath (1.7m)

You can grab it from Amazon under for £75 here.

By January 24, 2017 Read More →

Speedlink announces Nintendo Switch Accessories

sl-330600-bk_rgb_001Nintendo fans have long been counting down the days until they can finally get their hands on the new Nintendo Switch® console. According to the Japanese manufacturer, the home video gaming system will go on sale at the start of March. To ensure gaming enthusiasts are well-equipped for the new console, SPEEDLINK is proud to announce a range of accessories for the new console in advance of its official sales launch.

SPEEDLINK was founded in 1998, and the team behind the brand has been working flat-out for many weeks to bring consumers its new lineup ahead of the sales launch of the Nintendo Switch® – the Japanese video game and console manufacturer’s new platform. The initial range of accessories, including multi-piece starter kits, is expected to be available online and in stores from mid-February onwards – before the console’s global release.

“As a brand whose roots lie in the gaming world and which produced accessories for the Amiga and C64, we can’t wait for the new console – especially as we’re also passionate gamers. As one of the leading providers of computer and video game accessories, we simply just had to develop a matching lineup for the Nintendo Switch® and launch it in good time before the console goes on sale”, said Steffen Soltau, Head of Corporate Communications at Jöllenbeck GmbH.

All the accessories are already available to pre-order online, with two starter kits expected to be added to the lineup at the end of January.

Posted in: Accessories, gaming, News
By September 9, 2016 Read More →

Creative HS800 Fatal1ty Gaming Headset unboxing and review

vlcsnap-00040A very budget orientated gaming headset that has received a price drop in favour of a new model, the Creative Fatality is an ergonomically designed and acoustically tuned headset endorsed by Johnathan ‘Fatal1ty’ Wendel.

Padded headband and earpieces for ambient noise exclusion and comfort during long gaming sessions.
Swivel joint earpiece design adapts to every user.
Detachable and adjustable noise-cancelling microphone.
In-line external volume control with microphone on/off.
Excellent response for voice communications and dynamic in-game audio, with extended bass response for high-impact explosions.
Other Characteristics:
Colour of product: Black
Connectivity technology: Wired
Device interface: 3.5 mm (1/8″)
Ear coupling: Supraaural
Headphone frequency: 20 – 20000 Hz
Headphone sensitivity: 110 dB
Headset type: Binaural
Impedance: 32 Ω
Magnet type: neodymium
Microphone frequency: 100 – 15000 Hz
Microphone input impedance: 10 Ω
Microphone sensitivity: -40 dB
Purpose: PC/Gaming
Weight: 200 g
Windows operating systems supported: Windows 7 Home Premium, Windows 7 Home Premium x64, Windows 7 Professional, Windows 7 Professional x64, Windows 7 Starter, Windows 7 Starter x64, Windows 7 Ultimate, Windows 7 Ultimate x64, Windows Vista Business, Windows Vista Business x64, Windows Vista Home Basic, Windows Vista Home Basic x64, Windows Vista Home Premium, Windows Vista Home Premium x64, Windows Vista Ultimate, Windows Vista Ultimate x64

Online electronics retailer www.reichelt.co.uk, many products up to 20% cheaper than elsewhere in the UK.

 

By August 11, 2016 Read More →

Logitech G610 Orion Red Review

rgbWhen reviewing a gaming keyboard it is incredibly difficult to actually benchmark a keyboard in some way to say whether or not you have a good or bad keyboard from a score that is accrued through various tests. A keyboard very much boils down to whether or not you like it, can communicate with the easily and it’s comfortable for you to be productive or enjoy some leisure time.

The Logitech G610 is an entirely different keyboard to the Logitech G510.  Where the G510 focused on additional features such as media, LCD screens, gaming profiles and programmable buttons the G610 loses all of that in favour of an entirely new hardware approach and a back to basics gaming experience that is determined to win the user over through performance as opposed to extra features.

g610-orion-keyboard

The G610 features Cherry MX mechanical switches. These are favoured by gamers and considered to be a standard as they are more consistent in feel and responsiveness, they can take more abuse than rubber dome keyboards. These low-noise switches have a linear keypress for rapid-fire actuation. Cherry MX switches are rated to over 50 million keystrokes and actuate precisely for a reliable gaming experience.

To be honest I find the G610 is a bit of a let down whenever it comes to included features. I love myself some extra buttons to be able to program for additional functionality on the computer and save for some Media buttons in the top right corner the G610 doesn’t provide any of that.  Of course you can program the function buttons on the top row from F1 to F12, however having some dedicated memory buttons is a great feature that most gamers these days will probably have started to rely on even if it is just for storing Memes. There isn’t even a wrist rest included in the box.

That said I would imagine including extra buttons and features would have ramped up the price of this keyboard drastically. Tearing out the membrane innards of the G510 and putting in a whole mechanical key array would ramp up the costs before you know it.

IMG_20160810_175652

 

How is the performance of a gaming keyboard when of all the media buttons have been removed?  It’s hard going, it takes a while to get used to especially if you have been using something other than a mechanical keyboard before. The travel on each key when pressing is a greater distance and can result in a multitude of errors especially when typing for a long period. When gaming the benefits are noticeable almost immediately.  The slightest touch of a button registers which results in near instantaneous reactions. Hardly ideal for typing a document however once mastered there is nothing quite like tapping away at a keyboard that emits a satisfying clack.

 

The look and feel of the keyboard it’s very simple with almost a no frills approach, aside from the backlight. There’s a lot of fun to be had here as the lighting flickers in uniform depending on how you have the keys set to light up. There is a dedicated button for the backlight however rather than being an on/off button, you have to press the button  number of times to dim the backlight and gradually turn the backlight off. A simple feature of holding the button in to turn the backlight off might be nice as if you leave your computer on 24 hours a day that means the backlight on your keyboard is more than likely going to be on with it. When the computer is locked the keyboard takes it upon itself to display some eye candy, lighting up keys and simulating a wave of light from left to right. The backlight is bright at the highest setting, every key is visible.

IMG_20160810_175530

 

The volume roller is large and responsive, it’s easy to find alongside the rest of the media controls that surround it. Hastily jamming your finger down in that area generally meets with the required function you’re looking for. Various other keyboards on the market have a small congregation of keys that are interlinked, this one goes for large and separate and therefore less room for error.

 

IMG_20160810_175635

One of the best features are the legs of this keyboard, there are three options. Laid flat on the rubber feet, setting 4 and setting 8. I am guessing the 4 and 8 are millimetre elevation. Also, cable and the connection between the cable and the keyboard is nicely reinforced. This keyboard will travel well and it built to last.

IMG_20160810_175539

 

Sound wise the keyboard is fairly quiet for a mechanical keyboard, it has a satisfying clack as you tap away, however, if like me you record a podcast fortnightly you have to be vigilant when typing or else the sound of the keys will be almost audible in the recording. As a gamer using a microphone and headphone setup

Logitech has a very simple to use interface when it comes to the software for the keyboard.  Everything is laid out very nicely and is very simple to navigate around. Icons are colourful and explanatory and there is a wealth of options available on how to set up the keyboard for various different profiles. It’s easy to switch between profiles to display various keys being highlighted when using a particular game, these profiles can be amended to the user’s preference or setup from scratch.

Would I carry on using the Logitech G610?  Unlikely, I don’t game as often as I used to and spend much more time writing. In all honesty, I’ll be moving back to the Logitech G510 once I finish writing this. The G610 will go to my stepdaughter who is an avid gamer playing World of Warcraft and League of Legends. The keyboard will easily benefit her and be a welcome upgrade to the aging and noisy Corsair she has been using.

By May 16, 2016 Read More →

Two-way SLI support for the GTX 1080 and more?

15124035975lSince the news of the unparalleled performance of the GTX 1080 broke last week, there has been little concrete information regarding the SLI support of Nvidia’s GTX 1080, leading many to assume that Nvidia is not talking about it therefore nothing to report. Two-way SLI with Nvidia’s new GPU would simply be impossible. 

We have now confirmed with several sources that this is not the case, with one source stating that the GTX 1080 will not only work with Nvidia’s new HB (High Bandwidth) SLI bridges but also with existing SLI bridges. This means that traditional 3-way or 4-way SLI bridges can be fitted and work with this new GPU.

At this time, Nvidia has not released any information regarding any 3-way or 4-way versions of their HB SLI bridge, which leaves many to speculate that only traditional 3-way or 4-way SLI bridges can be used for higher end SLI configurations. Right now Nvidia claims that their new HB SLI bridge will offer better SLI performance and scaling than traditional SLI bridges as the new HB bridge will offer double the bandwidth. Meaing older Nvidia SLI bridges will limit Nvidia’s SLI performance, however we are not sure as to how much.

By May 16, 2016 Read More →

ASUS release ROG Strix GL502 Gaming Laptop

ASUS-ROG-Strix-GL502ASUS has released their new ROG Strix GL502 Gaming laptop. This comes with an IPS screen, the i7 Skylake CPU and a GTX 980m GPU. The ROG Strix GL502 is designed to be the sweet spot between portability and gaming capability, coming in with a 15.6″ form factor and a total weight of only 2.2Kg. This laptop can come with a 4K or 1080p display, up to 32GB RAM and a 512GB NVMe M.2 SSD. This series of laptop also comes with support for Nvidia’s G-Sync technology, which will eliminate screen tearing while gaming.

The cooling on the GPU is an “exclusive” system that incorporates copper heat pipes and dual fans in order to keep temperatures low under load. Right now ASUS has not revealed anything more specific on this new notebook cooling system.

   The first gaming notebook for ROG Strix makes its debut in the form of a compact powerhouse. Featuring a 6th Gen. Intel Core i7 processor, up to Nvidia GTX 980M 4GB/8GB with G-SYNC, NVMe PCIe X4 SSD, dual thermal design, and GameFirst III.

 

 

 

Posted in: gaming, Laptops, News
By May 13, 2016 Read More →

Hands on with the Predator 17 laptop #Acerliveblog2016

Photogallery_Predator_17_front-rightSun, Blue Skies and Acer Products Galore, It’s a rare day in Belfast that the sun shines continuously but with it being the infamous Friday the 13th today luckily is one of those days! With the added bonus of Belfast hosting this years #Acerliveblog2016 this weekend will definitely be one to remember.

With bloggers from all over the UK attending Acer’s annual event, we met up at the luxurious 5 star Merchant Hotel and entered the ‘room’  to which could only be described as an undercover communications room you would see in a blockbuster films. Forget the red room of pain Acer have created a red room for playing with Acer;s iconic Predator logos glowing on the back of the laptops and the rooms red back lighting this would be a gamers dream come true.

  • The Predator monitor range Predator Z35 £799.99, Predator X34 £899.99 Predator XB271HU £549.99
  • The Predator Desktop range G6 £1199.99 G3 £972.95, G1 £549.99
  • The Predator 15 laptop £1187.97 Predator 17 £1449.79
  • Predator Z650 projector £939.32
  • Predator 8 tablet £199.99
  • Liquid Zest 4G £109 available June
  • Jade Primo £429 without dock £475 with doc

Hands on with the Predator 17 laptop

This laptop looks and feels premium. With the back lit keyboard and sleek matt rubberised casing you know Acer have not spare any expense in creating this laptop range.

Specs:

  • Intel core i7
  • Nvidia Geforce GTX 980m
  • Blu ray Disc
  • Full HD 1080
  • Preloaded was metal gear solid V The Phantom, I was  PC gamer in my younger days however moved to popular consoles as  the desktop I had could not sustain the constant spec needed for games. This laptop could reignite my love for PC gaming.
  • Subwooofer speakers – powerful sound
  • Thunderbolt 3 8x faster than usb 3.0
  • Acer also have the Predator gaming headset
  • Curved Gaming at Full Throttle: Predator Z35 Monitor

The Predator Z35 is the first 35-inch product of Acer’s Predator Z Series curved gaming monitors with NVIDIA® G-SYNC™. Its 35-inch 21:9 UltraWide Full HD (2560×1080) panel features a curvature of 2000R for an immersive, wraparound gaming experience. The Predator Z35 gaming monitor incorporates NVIDIA® ULMB™ (Ultra Low Motion Blur) technology , reducing motion blur by delivering sharp edges in fast-paced gaming environments, and supports overclocking to a lightning-fast 200Hz refresh rate, so gamers can find their enemies before they spot them and enjoy crystal clear turns on the racetrack.

Pixel-Perfect for a Competitive Edge: Predator XB1 Monitor The Predator XB1 Series gaming monitors feature the latest NVIDIA® G-SYNC™ technology, giving gamers a competitive edge with pixel-perfect images and smooth visuals. The 27-inch models (XB271HK / XB271HU) all feature a ZeroFrame edge-to-edge design, with 4K UHD (3840 x 2160) or WQHD (2560 x 1440) IPS panels that support 100% of the sRGB color gamut, while the XB271HU support NVIDIA® ULMB™ and refresh rates of up to 144Hz. The 28-inch model (XB281HK) features a 4K UHD panel that has a fast  GTG (Gray to Gray) response time of 1ms, rendering fast-moving actions or dramatic transitions smoothly without smearing or ghosting.

In-Game Advantage with GameView The new Predator gaming monitors feature Acer’s GameView technology, which allow gamers to swiftly toggle between three customizable display profiles, tweaking settings such as Dark Boost, Overclock, and aim-point assistance for different types of games. This allows quick display adjustment while in- game, without the need to navigate through layers of OSD menus, especially when every split second counts.

Pricing and Availability

The Predator Z35 gaming monitor will be available in EMEA in November with prices starting at €1,099.

The Predator XB1 Series gaming monitors will be available in EMEA in October with prices starting at €699.

Exact specifications, prices, and availability will vary by region. To find out about availability, product specifications and prices in specific markets, please contact your nearest Acer office or retailer via www.acer.com.

The new products were unveiled today at the next@acer press event at IFA Berlin in Germany, where the company announced its latest devices and solutions for gamers and consumers for the holiday season. Visit Acer’s booth at IFA 2015 in Messe Berlin (Hall 12/101) or learn about the new product range on acer.com/nextatacer.

See the fun as it happens:

Posted in: Editorial, gaming, Laptops, News